Master project on mechanical regulation of cell differentiation in the embryonic pancreas – University of Copenhagen

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07 February 2018

Master project on mechanical regulation of cell differentiation in the embryonic pancreas

project

The Semb Group is seeking a highly motivated MSc student to join their lab. The student will join a study on how mechanical tension regulates tube formation and cellular differentiation during embryogenesis.

We are looking for a master student to study how mechanical tension regulates tube formation and cellular differentiation during embryogenesis.

The student will be part of a multidisciplinary team (biologists, physicists and computer scientists) working together on this exciting question. The project will involve some mouse work, and has a heavy emphasis on confocal and multiphoton microscopy of live and immunofluorescence stained specimens. The project will also involve quantitative image analysis, and if the student is interested, MATLAB coding.

Qualifications:

• Master student from the life sciences (molecular biomedicine, biology etc.)

• Interest in developmental biology and advanced imaging

• Independent, curious, and able to work in an international and cross-disciplinary team

• FELASA certification and/or interest in MATLAB coding is a plus, but no requirement

Start date in 2018 is negotiable.

The master student will be part of Professor Semb group at DanStem and will be daily supervised by Assistant professor Pia Nyeng and postdoc Silja Heilmann.

Please contact pia.nyeng@sund.ku.dk for further information.

About the Novo Nordisk Center for Stem Cell Biology, DanStem

DanStem consists of 11 research groups who all address basic questions in stem cell and developmental biology with the overall aim of developing of new therapies for cancer and chronic diseases such as diabetes and liver failure.

The Semb lab has two main goals 1) to understand how cell polarity and tissue architecture control cell fate specification and 2) to translate this knowledge into efficient and reliable strategies for regenerative medicine in diabetes.