11 June 2018

Collaborative effort of CPR and DanStem has revealed the enzymatic 'barcode reader' which switches our genes

discovery

Researchers from DanStem and CPR have now discovered thousands of new gene regulatory marks. This contributes in understanding how cells turn on genes and will aid in the development of new drugs to fight cancer.

Our bodies are composed of more than two hundred different types of cells that perform different jobs and form different organs, such as in the skin, blood or the brain. Although all cells have an identical set of genes, different cells express a different subset of them to gain unique identity and function. A Danish research group, in collaboration with international partners, has now uncovered the targets of key enzymes, called CBP and p300, that control which genes are switched on or off.

“CBP and p300 are at the heart of the way by which cells mark genes that need to be turned on. The enzyme functions as a barcode writer that puts chemical marks on the genome to turn on specific genes that define cellular identity. We identified thousands of previously unknown marks and this new knowledge will be important for understanding how cell identity is established and how dysregulation of these enzymes results in diseases, such as cancer” explains the lead author of the study Professor Chuna Choudhary, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research, University of Copenhagen.

Time-resolved analysis reveals rapid dynamics and broad scope of the CBP/p300 acetylome” has been published in Cell. Chuna Choudhary is employed at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Centre for Protein Research, University of Copenhagen. The project was carried out in collaboration with researchers from the USA and the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Stem Cell Biology,DanStem, Denmark.

Read the full story published on Science News HERE

Read more about Joshua Brickman and about the Brickman group 


Time-resolved analysis reveals rapid dynamics and broad scope of the CBP/p300 acetylome” has been published in Cell. The project was carried out in collaboration with researchers from the USA.